Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Turnip’

My birthday is in December, and as it was on his day off, he planned making 10-course birthday dinner for me. While I was working, he went shopping for those ingredients.

The course was served as tapas style first and then two mains and two dessert!

1st course: Smoked Ham, Pear, and Goat Brie Crostini

Smoked Ham, Pear, and Goat Brie Crostini

2nd course: Broccoli Soup with Goat Brie

Broccoli Soup with Goat Brie

The last time he made was much better, I mean, this was a bit watery.

3rd course: Swiss Chard Sausage, Yam, Dijon Gravy

Swiss Chard Sausage, Yam, Dijon Gravy

This was interesting dish and delicious! I would order again! 😀

4th course: Bruschetta with Arugula & Tomatoes (for two)

Bruschetta with Arugula & Tomatos (for two)

5th course: Marinated Eggplant & Salmon

Marinated Eggplant & Salmon

This was my least favorite. I loved the marinated eggplant as usual, but salmon was lukewarm, which he said it was intentional but it was weird to me.

6th course: Lamb Chop, pan-seared Root Vegetables, Swiss Chard, Dijon red wine sauce

Lamb Chop, pan-seared Root Vegetables, Swiss Chard, Dijon red wine sauce

The lamb chop was beautifully cooked. We shared it, which is good, because I was getting full at this point.

7th course: Salmon, Crab Mashed Potatoes, and Turnip Hash

Salmon, Crab Mashed Potatoes, and Turnip Hash

The salmon was nicely cooked, too. The crab mash was a bit softer than the one he made before, so that it lost the texture. I really liked the turnip hash.

8th course: Spaghetti Carbonara with Prawns and Scallop

Spaghetti Carbonara with Prawns and Scallop

At this point, I was too full. I wished I can share, but he made this full size for himself as well. The taste was good, though.

9th course: Chocolate Panna Cotta

Chocolate Panna Cotta

I was too full to have two dessert, so he arranged this dessert, using both ingredients. Panna Cotta was a little loose, so it was like mousse.

This would be the last birthday dinner cooked by him, as he said he rather buy gifts next time. 🙂

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Last month, I wrote a post about Farmer’s Market that I got some vegetables. One of them was Kabu (Japanese white turnip). I got another one at Fujiya this time, so I searched for some recipe.

Kabu (Japanese white turnip) from Ice Cap Organics at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

(Same picture at the post for Farmer’s Market)

As I had some wieners in the freezer, I chose this recipe. It was easy to make. That is important for me!

Kabu and Wiener Pot-au-feu

Kabu and Wiener Pot-au-feu

(All pictures taken by iPhone)

Oh, it ended up a really good meal. If I get Kabu, I will make this again, especially in the winter time. The recipe is for 2, but I doubled the ingredients, because I wanted to use more Kabu before going bad.

Kabu and Wiener Pot-au-feu (Japanese)

[Ingredients] (serve for 2)

– Kabu 2
– Potato 1 big one
– Onion 1
– Carrot 1/2 big one
– Wiener/Sausage 6 (maybe 4 if big ones)
– Consume soup 3 cups
– Bay leaf 1
– Salt and Black Pepper pinch

[Recipe]

  1. Cut the stems leaving 1cm with Kabu, peel and cut in half. Cut the stem and leaves part into 4-5cm long.
  2. Peel potato and onion and cut into 4 pieces. Cut carrot 4-6cm long like wiener.
  3. Put Kabu and its stems except leaves, and veggies, bay leaf, consome soup, into a pot, and boil. Once boiled, lower the heat and cook for 15 – 20 min. Add wieners and cook for another 10 min.
  4. When veggies are cooked softly, add Kabu leaves, and season with salt and black pepper.

I left the skin on Kabu so I cooked for extra min until it became soft. Also, to make the cooking time short, I cut veggies smaller than the recipe says.

Read Full Post »

I was looking at the Farmer’s Market website if there were vegetables that I was waiting for. You can search by product name, which even though you find the product available, sometimes it  isn’t available at the booth due to the weather. Anyways, it will help you check before you go.

What I was looking for were Mizuna and Kabu (Japanese white turnip). On that day, I went to West End Farmer’s Market.

Mizuna from Langley Organic Growers

Mizuna from Langley Organic Growers at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

Mizuna from Langley Organic Growers at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

Kabu (Japanese white turnip) from Ice Cap Organics

Kabu (Japanese white turnip) from Ice Cap Organics at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

Kabu (Japanese white turnip) from Ice Cap Organics at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

Kabu (Japanese white turnip) from Ice Cap Organics at Farmer's Market in Vancouver

It was said Hakurei. When you search on the link above, this is not searchable. It seems to be categorized in Turnip.

With Mizuna, you can make salad or soup. It has slight bitter taste like arugula, if you eat as raw. With Kabu, you can make pickles, soup, etc. It has sweet taste if you cook in soup.

(All pictures taken by iPhone)

Here are some cooking with Mizuna.

Mizuna Salad

Mizuna Salad

[Recipe]

  1. Rinse Mizuna and cut into 4-5cm long. Cut mini tomato in half.
  2. Mix with Yuzu Ponzu dressing. (Any citrus would be good, according to my friend.)
  3. Sprinkle bonito flakes on top.

Stewed Mizuna and Deep Fried Bean Curd

Stewed Mizuna and Deep Fried Bean Curd

This is from one of my cooking school textbooks that I got long time ago.

[Ingredients] (serve for 4)

– Mizuna 1/2 bunch
Deep fried bean curd 1 sheet (I used 2 small ones.)
– Dashi Soup 2 cups
– Sugar 2 tablespoons
– Usukuchi Soy Sauce 3 tablespoons (I used regular soy sauce for 2 and half tablespoons and adjust later.)
– Salt a pinch
– Sake 2 tablespoons

[Recipe]

  1. Cut and split if the Mizuna root comes with. Rinse Mizuna and drain. Cut them into 4cm long.
  2. Remove unnecessary oil from deep fried bean curd by pouring boiled waiter. (We called Abura-nuki.) Cut them into 2-3mm width (and 4cm long).
  3. Put Dashi soup, sugar, soy sauce, salt and Sake in the pot and boil. Once it’s boiled, add Mizuna and deep fried bean curd, and stew a bit.

I don’t have Usukuchi (thin) soy sauce, so I use regular soy sauce. You might want to use less, but it depends on how you like the taste. This dish tastes good even when it gets cold.

Read Full Post »